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RF Video Shoot Interview with Eric Bischoff, Disc One

This was released in 2014

The Interview was conducted by Rob Feinstein

Disc One runs at two hours and thirty four minutes long




He talked about where he grew up just outside of Detroit, which he said was near "8 Mile." He said it was a tough place to live but before it declined even further. He watched "Big Time Wrestling" as a kid and remembered The Sheik, Dick the Bruiser, and Bobo Brazil. Bischoff talked about moving a lot as a kid and seeing multiple territories as a result. He said that he never thought about being in the wrestling business as a kid.



Bischoff is asked about his career before wrestling as he says he had a profession that began with almost every letter of the alphabet. Before wrestling, he was a manager at a food processing company and even managed a karate school, even fighting at times. He said he had some fights on ESPN too but it did not pay the bills.



He actually met Sonny Onoo before he got into wrestling. They met on the karate tournament circuit as Bischoff said he was a great kickboxer and one of the best in the country in kata. One night, they were at a bar talking about their childhoods then came up with the concept for the "Ninja Star Wars" game. Bischoff ended up calling the AWA and got a meeting with Verne to try to get advertising. Bischoff said that the pitched went great and made a deal where he would everything and Verne do the promotion and split that 50/50. Bischoff said that was his first time doing a business like that and it wasn't that successful but it was a learning experience and as a result, Verne gave him a job handling the AWA syndication. Bischoff had no experience in that but said that said he did sales before and just used the experience he had to sell. This was in 1987.



On Verne Gagne, he said that they were friends at that time and would go hunting together and spent Christmas together as well. Bischoff calls Verne the most stubborn person he knew and didn't realize until the end that his ideas were not working. Bischoff also blamed the government in Minnesota for instituting imminent domain and taking part of his land, only offering him 25% of what it was worth.



He tells the story of how he got to become an interviewer. Larry Nelson got popped for a DUI and could not make it to TV that morning. Bischoff said that once a month Verne would fly everyone in to do promos in various markets and after Larry never came, Greg suggested to Verne that he (Bischoff) do them as he was good looking and was the only one who wore a tie. Bischoff said that he was uncomfortable and he did horrible.



About his friendship with DDP, Bischoff said that he found DDP loud and obnoxious at first. After a show they were at a corporate event and he said something to DDP, who said something back. Bischoff then saw him leaving in the parking lot and went after him but he left. Bischoff then went back inside and a had a drink and when he left he saw DDP again but they decided to let it go and the next day they talked and became friends.



He talks auditioning for the WWF in 1990. Bischoff talked about how he was in the AWA at the end and was going weeks without getting paid and when he did they were partial checks and that his house was foreclosed on and his car was getting repossessed and asked Verne if he could take the audition. He said that he did not get the job and remembers Kevin Dunn talking into his earpiece while he was in front of the green screen about stuff that had nothing to do with the mock interview he was conducting.



Bischoff got hired by WCW after sending an audition tape. At the time he had no money and struggled to feed his family. He got flown down to the Omni once a month for two days and made $85,000.



He was and still is friends with Teddy Long and recalls that on Friday's they would go down to Casa Gallardo, a Mexican restaurant in Atlanta, to eat nachos and drink $3 margaritas.



On Jim Ross, Bischoff talks about how Jim Herd brought him in to keep JR and Tony Schiavone to "keep them miserable." Bischoff said because of that, JR was not very personable at all but even still remained supportive. He said that Schiavone was quiet and a hard worker but also not very nurturing either. He puts them both over as being hard workers.



He had minimal interaction with the talent at the beginning of his WCW stint. Even still, he did not like Lex Luger from the first day he met him.



On the announcing differences between AWA and WCW, he said that Verne would yell at you and tell you what to do at times while in WCW there were barely any constraints at all and just tell you that you did a good job.



When asked why WCW was so mismanaged in the early 90's, Bischoff said that you have in keep in mind that when Ted Turner bought them out from Crockett they were a bankrupt company that was already terribly mismanaged. Then he talks about how they tried to fix it with those same people at that time.



Bischoff talks about how when he got to WCW no one but Turner in the corporate offices wanted wrestling on the network, thus WCW never got all that much in terms of support.



Bischoff talks about some of the guys in charge. He said Kip Frey was a deer in headlights and did not know anything about the wrestling business. He then said that Bill Watts was a bully who wanted to bring things back to the 70's to make up for low ratings. He then said the talent started to work more conservatively as Watts made it more dangerous by taking away the mats on the floor. He said that Watts would do stuff like bring a gun to the Omni and put it on his desk to show that he is a tough guy. Bischoff said that Watts always had to prove that he was tough and feels that people who act like that are usually "pussies" and just overcompensating. He said that the Executive Committee was looking for any excuse to get rid of wrestling at the time and that Watts was basically doing just that for them. Bischoff then said that he heard through Bill Shaw that they wanted to get away from the old-school wrestling mentality and hire an executive.



On how he became the Executive Producer, Bischoff said that he had a grasp on how to run events and the television side, although not an expert, and knew the business from the wrestling side and decided to throw is name in the hat for the job, saying the worst that could happen was that he would not get the job. When asked, Bischoff said that Jim Ross got unfairly linked to Watts, who they wanted gone. Bischoff said that WCW picked him as he had a newer approach and saw what was wrong with the current product at that time. He said that Ross was miserable there and not just because he got the Executive job but said that he has talked to him and they are friends today.



He said that they needed better production values but before that they needed more fans in the building as if there is no one there to see the show, there is no point of improving your production values.  He said that he believed by co-branding with Disney studios it would help change the perception of WCW with advertisers, sponsors, and the PPV company. The alternative to that was to continue booking TV tapings in arenas that fans were not coming too. He said that they always papering the house shows and said they would do that in a city of three times in a row then charge them to come to the 4th show and of course no one bought tickets. Bischoff said that it was actually more expensive to run the shows there but necessary to build the brand as wrestling fans are brand loyal.



About being second behind the WWF, Bischoff said that they were so far behind them that if it was a horse race they would have shot them for being so far behind. Bischoff said that he wanted  fans to like WCW as much as other wrestling companies.



On switching to a monthly PPV model, Bischoff said that they had to in order to make a profit. He was also not surprised when WWF swtiched to that as he said they did it because WCW had success.



Bischoff is asked about getting Turner to spend money on talents like Bobby Heenan, Gene Okerlund, and Hulk Hogan. He first goes on about people want to tell a narrative about Turner having an open checkbook and that he used him like an ATM but the truth was that WCW was losing $10 million a year and Turner had not made a profit in any year since taking over. Bischoff said that he first cut costs and the first thing was to stop house shows as they lost money every time they went out of the door and Bob Dhue, WCW Vice President, wanted to do more house shows and Bischoff said how the fuck does that make any sense so he decided to stop all of the house shows until they built up their TV shows. Talent was pissed and dubbed him "Evil Eric" as that cost them money. Bischoff said that the people who wanted WCW to go away within Turner weren't as angry when they were starting to break even. At that time, he went to Turner and Bill Shaw wanting to sign Hogan. After that went over well, they gave him more money to sign Okerlund and Heenan then they started to get more viewers, better PPV numbers, and started to run house shows again with more fans coming to the arena. When asked, Bischoff said that he never felt that Hogan was leveraging him during the process.



He also said that Ric Flair was critical of Hogan coming into WCW. Hogan trusted working with Flair according to Bischoff as he knew he could make him look good. Bischoff said that deep down inside he feels that Hogan is an honest and generous guy but at times can be very insecure.



Bischoff puts over Hogan for helping the WCW brand as he got them known as more than a regional Southern product. He said that while some of the crowds did not react favorably towards Hogan, he was phenomenal from the business side.



About Randy Savage coming into WCW, Bischoff said that Hogan called him up and wanted Savage in WCW. Bischoff said at that time they were profitable for the first time in WCW history. He then said not only was Savage coming to WCW but so was the "Slim Jim" sponsorship so as a result he basically got Savage for free. Bischoff liked Savage but said that he was very eccentric and insecure.



He is asked about Steve Austin. Bischoff said that he had a chip on his shoulder as the focus of WCW was on Hogan. Bischoff said that at the time he let him go and would do it today as well as it was the right move then. Bischoff then talks about how the Stone Cold character would have never emerged in WCW and he needed to leave the company to find his stride.



Bischoff is asked about several behind-the-scenes guys. He got along with Zane Bresloff and said he could milk as much as he could from the individual markets. He didn't care for Gary Jester and said he was like a "potted plant." He liked Craig Leathers (director) and put him over for always being able to work under pressure. He liked Harvey Schiller and said he was a great buffer for the corporate side. Bischoff likes Dusty Rhodes a lot but also said that his ego problems with Flair got to be too much. Bischoff said that he relied a lot upon Kevin Sullivan at the beginning but that they have different ideas. He said "no comment" when asked about Sharon Sidello (Head of the PPV Division, also rumored to have played Fifi the Maid on the "Flair for the Gold" segments but that was played by Wendy Barlow). He said that DDP was instrumental in bringing in Hall and Nash and acted as a liaison of sorts with the talent.



He is asked about the meeting that led to Nitro starting. He said that he was pitching an idea to Turner to work out a TV deal in China, who asked him what did they have to do to be competitive with the WWF. Bischoff said that WWF was in primetime while they were on 6pm on Saturday night. Turner then said to give WCW two hours on Monday night and Bischoff said that everyone's jaw dropped when it was announced.



Bischoff's first move was that he locked himself in a room and thought of how he was going to make this work. He said that if he failed, it was over as all of the hard work would be going down the toilet. He then said that he had to become different in order to beat the WWF, not to copy them.



His concerns about going head-to-head were how to beat them by doing the opposite of what they were doing, like aiming at the 18-34 demographic instead of kids and going live instead of being taped. Bischoff said he came up with this after writing down a list of everything the WWF was doing.



On why he kept himself on the air as a broadcaster, Bischoff said he was decent at it but also knew what he needed to sell.



When asked why he hired Steve McMichael as an announcer to break up the monotony and to have a crazy character.



Bischoff never saw the appeal of bringing Luger back to WCW and had no idea of how to use him and never trusted him, either. Sting persuaded Bischoff to hire him back so he called Luger and gave him a $125,000/ 3 month contract but when he came back he was a different person and it ended up working out. He talks about his surprise return was instrumental in setting the tone for Nitro and how anything could happen live.



About getting negative feedback for giving away RAW results live on air, Bischoff said that both management and talent did not like that and thought it was stupid.



Rob asks him point blank about Vince McMahon's comments about Bischoff trying to hurt the WWF instead of helping his own product. Bischoff said that was false and puts over Vince for when he worked there but says that is Vince's perspective as to what was going on and that his people were telling him that. Bischoff does state he was trying to be #1 but it was all about appealing to the audience and getting them to shift their viewing habits.



He also calls out the comments about stealing talent from the WWE and the narrative they are trying to portray. Bischoff calls it hypocritical seeing they did that in the 80's. He also said that the company still holds resentment towards him for that.



Bischoff wanted Nitro to go on early so he could give away results in order to create controversy.



About the ratings, he would get occasional calls from Turner and his guys giving him brief congratulations.



On the "Monday Night War" Bischoff said that the fans did not get into that until the WWF acknowledge WCW on air. He also said that Turner thought the Billionaire Ted sketches were funny.



He is then asked about Nitro going to air sometimes while the show was still being written. Bischoff said that it happened sometimes then brings up a "Business Week" article about Vince who said that he writes RAW that way today. Bischoff said that sometimes people come up with better ideas and that you make a change if that is the case.




When asked about bringing in Chris Benoit, Eddie Guerrero, and Dean Malenko, Bischoff said that most of the guys looked and wrestled the same so in order to stand out you had to be different. He saw these guys from working in Japan and knew they did stuff the heavyweights could not do so he wanted them to be the "human car crash" part of the show.



About Benoit, Bischoff said he was very intense and quiet. He felt that Eddie was very cautious of people and at the time was wondering if he made the right decision in leaving Japan. He then said that Malenko was quiet and professional.



Rob asks him about moving a TV taping and if it was intentionally trying to screw over ECW in Philadelphia. Bischoff said that he does not recall but also said that at the time he was doing a lot of "aggressive shit."



On WWE resurrecting the ECW brand in 2005, Bischoff said he never understood why that happened. He then said looking back, ECW was a show that got low TV ratings and did small PPV buyrates but had a passionate fanbase. From a business perspective, it was awful, but never understood how the WWE would bring back the passion they had into a sterile environment.



Regarding the "One Night Stand" PPVBischoff said that he never understood the ECW product but had heat with their fanbase and ended up having a blast on the show. He said he loved the heat he had on the show. While working with the Dudley's, he suggested that they threw him in the garbage at the finish as the crowd would love it and they did.



Bischoff said that the nWo idea was the culmination of the realism in wrestling that he saw in Japan. He said that the real motivator of the angle was that both Hall & Nash were getting revenge from being mistreated in WCW then leaving for the WWF, only to come back to WCW to seek revenge on the company. He did realize that he had something great in this angle. He also added that he knew he was going to have a 3rd member but did not know exactly who would fill the role at first. Later on he did confirm that if Hogan refused to turn heel, they were going to go with Sting as the 3rd member.



About today's wrestling, Bischoff said that the current audience has been saturated with reality and that the animated, 80's style of programming will not work.



Back to Hogan turning heel, Bischoff said that he wanted Hogan to turn six months before he did but Hogan refused. Bischoff recalled that he was at Hogan's home and pitched an idea but Hogan said that he had to pick up his kids and that he would never understand his character without walking in his boots. Months later while on the set of "Santa With Muscles," Hogan called up Bischoff and wanted him to come on the set. Hogan had been watching Nitro and told Bischoff that he should be the third guy in the nWo. Bischoff also said that Hogan knew the crowd reaction he was getting at the end of his face run was horrible but was not willing to risk his character until they had a great idea. When asked, he does not believe the nWo would have taken off if Sting was the one who turned heel because it would have been as shocking. Bischoff said there will probably never be a moment like that in wrestling again.



He talks about the night of the "Bash at the Beach" show. Bischoff said that he kept Sting around that night as the background plan because he was not fully convinced Hogan would show up as he was volatile at the time. Sullivan ended up staying with Hogan in order to keep him calm.



When asked if it was a mistake to put him in the nWo, Bischoff said that does not recall who came up with the idea. He knew he had heat and didnt think it was a giant leap for him to be put in the role.



He thinks that the Vince McMahon character was heavily influenced by what he was doing, citing that Vince went from suits to dressing in jackets.




Bischoff said that his outlook on life never changed but had more pressure as WCW got successful. He said he could have come across as arrogant but in reality was just extremely busy.



On not allowing Flair to take time off to see his son wrestle, Bischoff said that it was a game of chicken between the two as Flair basically told Bischoff to give him what he wants or else. Bischoff said that he did not want to give him the time off because he would have to do it for everyone. Bischoff said that he did not feel good about the situation but had to set a precedent.



When asked, he said that all of his major stars were not happy and it was impossible to keep them all pleased and said the pressure and difficulties of dealing with these strong personalities might have made him seem arrogant to others.



Bischoff is asked whether or not DDP's success was important to WCW. He first talks about how he loves him but that DDP's success was not that important to WCW. He said it was important to him and after a while it was beneficial to WCW but there was a whole roster of guys that got over huge and he was floundering for a while. He also said it was not fair for those to say that the only reason he got over was due to him being a friend.



On whether or not the lucahdores were disrespected, Bischoff said that from there perspective sure but that their roles on the show were to provide the "car crash" aspect again and said they made more money than ever. When the show got more popular, they demanded more money and wanted to be in the main events.



About Rey Mysterio, Bischoff said that he was an incredible performer but the American audience does not have the same appreciation for the mask than the Mexican audience and figured since he was a good looking guy the fans would then react more to him when he was selling. Bischoff said that he understands where Mysterio was coming from today and did not mean to disrespect him by removing his mask and notes that was not his intention at all.



Rob asks him about an incident when he reportedly threw coffee at Eddie Guerrero. Bischoff said that he did not throw it at him but he threw it on the ground and some of it landed on Guerrero. He doesnt remember the specifics but they were arguing and he got pissed off and threw it on the ground. He said that Guerrero could be forceful at times.




Final Thoughts: Good stuff so far. Bischoff has been open and seemingly honest here. He does not have an agenda but does want to shed the truth on the "narratives" that have been going on about him during his WCW run. Beyond that, he was willing to expand on his answers and kept a calm demeanor throughout the whole disc.

So far, I recommend Disc One and will have the Disc Two review up tomorrow at noon.


Comments

  1. "He also said that Turner thought the Billionaire Ted sketches were funny."


    Ouch.


    The rest of this interview makes me think Bischoff is an awesome guy to have running your show. Thoroughly and almost over-prepared, very thoughtful, super hard working, major hustle. McMahon should hire him to help run their show. =)

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  2. Wouldnt be the worst idea

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  3. I thought this recap would be boring because Eric gets asked the same questions all the time and answers them pretty much the same way. But it was actually quite interesting. Bischoff understood pro wrestling and he doesn't get enough credit.

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  4. "He also said that Ric Flair was critical of Hogan coming into WCW."

    I'm guessing that's a typo?

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  5. The amazing part about Hogan joining the nWo was how in just 2 years, Hogan had become so synonymous with WCW that the thought of him betraying them got such massive heat from the fans.


    And then Hogan became such a fantastic weasel heel that when he made attempts to become a face again in WCW, everybody looked at him sideways, knowing he was up to something.

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  6. It was him betraying the fans that got heat, not WCW.

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  7. How much creative control did Bischoff have in TNA because 2010 was an awful year for them.

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  8. "If it wasn't for Hulk Hogan, Eric Bischoff would still be selling meat from a truck in Minneapolis."

    Truer words have never been spoken in the wrestling business.

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  9. "He said "no comment" when asked about Sharon Sidello (Head of the PPV Division, also played Fifi the Maid on the "Flair for the Gold" segments)."
    Fifi' was played by Wendy Barlow, who, at least a year or two ago, was Flair's girlfriend.

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  10. "He then said not only was Savage coming to WCW but so was the "Slim Jim"
    sponsorship so as a result he basically got Savage for free."

    Another reason why Vince was an idiot for letting Savage go. His sponsorship basically made him free.

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  11. MikeyMike, JuggernautDecember 18, 2014 at 10:43 AM

    I thought that Vince wanted to keep the Slim John sponsorship and thought he could even if Savage left.

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  12. But... Eric was already promoted to head of WCW before he ever spoke a word to Hulk Hogan.

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  13. Vince McMahon would also still be a two-bit carny in New York instead of a lots of bit carny who thinks he isn't.

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  14. "He also said that Ric Flair was drunk"

    That should be right.

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  15. Slim Johns? Well, now we know Mikey buys the generic meat snacks.

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  16. Extant1979 - Mr. Cable AccessDecember 18, 2014 at 10:51 AM

    Or what he tells his girls to look for when they're working at nights...

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  17. If it wasn't for Hulk Hogan, all of these "Johnny come latelys" that
    you see out here wrestling wouldn't be here. He was selling the world out
    brother while they were bumming gas to put in their car to get to high
    school.

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  18. This actually reads as one of my favourites. Bischoff seems really honest here, and less delusional than some of the workers who do these.

    He gets that it's a business.

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  19. Was this before or after Hogan saved a crumbling inner-city school from a roving gang of Andre the Giants with help from one school custodian played by Louis Gossett, Jr?

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  20. This pretty much mimics his book. Bischoff was fairly honest in his book as well up until WCW hit it big. At this point he starts to gloss over things that cast him unfavorably, spin things a bit, etc. Bischoff's largest problem was also what got him to the dance; Big stars with big contracts and creative control. Bischoff could no longer navigate the waters. He wasn't a strong leader and didn't stand up to talent. He generally went with whatever big star was last in his ear.

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  21. HOLY SHIT!! Fifi was the head of the PPV division?!

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  22. Bischoff said that the pitched went great and made a deal where he would everything and Verne do the promotion and split that 50/50.

    Eh?

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  23. Hahaha on Hogan. "Walk a mile in my boots." What an ass.

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  24. It was before. After was when Hogan went to the Soviet Union and convinced them to dissolve. Then he played bass for Metallica the next day.

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  25. I really enjoyed a lot of this shoot. I didn't watch it all, because the thing wasn't, what 5 hours long? I'm sure that Bischoff had a lot to say, but they should edit these things down to a more reasonable length.


    Good review.

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  26. Thanks for the info. I changed it in the recap as well. When I googled Sidello, I found a few different message boards that said she was Fifi (It was the only info I really found on her) but that has been proven false.

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  27. I was wrong. That was a rumor for many years but in fact she was played by Wendy Barlow.

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  28. Of the game he was pitching to Verne, not the AWA

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  29. Thanks. Yeah its about four and a half hours long.

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  30. He does get into the stuff you mentioned in the second disc.

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  31. I didn't think I'd be interested in this, but you've done a really good job summarizing it. This sounds like a really interesting shoot and Bischoff himself sounds like a guy who understands how to run a fed.

    I'll actually try to get this. Thanks. I'm actually curious if he goes into his time at TNA. Should be interesting to hear his thoughts on Dixie, Angle and Jarrett.

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  32. While sidello wasn't fifi she was banging Ole

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  33. Thanks


    He actually did not talk about TNA at all and I think the rumor was that it was due to legal reasons.

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  34. Bischoff said that when he talked about bringing Hogan into WCW but did not go into it after that.

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  35. Hey...where's Mike Graham to take credit for EVERYTHING Bischoff actually did?

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  36. "I told Eric, 'instead of having the Clash shows, why not run pay-per-views instead?'"

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  37. Hogan has said Flair called him and sold him on coming to WCW.

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  38. The mask thing with Rey still drives me nuts. Really Bischoff?

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  39. Not just Rey, but I think Bischoff unmasked all the luchas.

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  40. Rey and Juvi are the only two I remember... I think La Parka lost his mask once, but that was accidental.

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  41. Just like Vince, Eric had his own vision for promoting and this was incorporating the Luchadors into the American roster. We all disagree, and he was wrong, but it's what he thought was right at the time. I only agree with if there are 20 luchadores on the roster, it does get tough to give them any distinction for the audience if they are all masked and in full bodysuits (they blend together). Maybe only have 3-4 masked luchadores. Idk.

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  42. Psychosis was blonde, right? If so, he's who I was thinking about.

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  43. Excellent work Bayless. On an unrelated note I've just discovered Caliber is writing next week's Ask411.

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  44. Bichoff's production company still makes Impact

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  45. basically the three biggest stars of luchadores lost their masks in Rey, Juvie and Psicosis.

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  46. Did Goldberg spear of La Parka's mask. Damn I miss The Chairman of WCW.


    Juventud should have ALWAYS been unmasked and cutting promos as THE JUICE~!


    If you smell lalalaalalala what the JUICE~! is COOKING~!

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  47. something about the thought of Eric Bishoff working with ECW fan cam operator Rob Feinstein is surreal

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  48. No. Rey way blonde once, doing a faux-Eminem thing.

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  49. It had its upsides.


    ReAction was a brilliant, ahead-of-its-time show that WWE should mimic.

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  50. This holiday season I am grateful for Bayless reviewing these things because I think id rather go to a dentist than sit and watch these things for 4 and a half hours.

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  51. " He said that he did not get the job and remembers Kevin Dunn talking
    into his earpiece while he was in front of the green screen about stuff
    that had nothing to do with the mock interview he was conducting."

    Well, at least they were giving him a realistic idea of what to expect.

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  52. It seems like Bischoff had tons of heat with everyone when he ran WCW but once he went to WWE, he went out of his way to be one of the guys and it seems like except for Flair, everyone was cool with him

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  53. Also, first class review Bayless.

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  54. Justin Watry used to do that and he cant be that bad.

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  55. At least we wont get Chandler faces. Which has to be an outside of America thing because ever since ive moved to England I hear about it pretty much everyday. Didnt Watry do one and people rioted? Thats why I like sforcina, he keeps the status quo. If he cant do it they should just skip it. Or google theor questions like anyone else would.

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  56. Who the fuck voted for this shit? This is nothing he hasn't told anyone before. BOD disappointing me :'(.


    Good recap Bayless. Thanks a lot.

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  57. I think years of perspective have shown Flair may have been more difficult to work with than we knew.

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  58. Byers does a good job too but dont tell scott I said that because they're like mortal enemies ot something.

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  59. I'm sure everytime Bischoff saw Flair have tears in his eyes he told him to quit going to Bret's hotel room.

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  60. The Ghost Of Meekin's MoobsDecember 18, 2014 at 2:03 PM

    Sforcina isn't as good as he once was and since the 411 revamp the column is a lot shorter.

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  61. I liked the review.. It's amazing how little credit Bischoff gets for changing the business. Every move the WCW made was countered by the WWF, if not outright copied. We need another Bischoff to light a fire under Vince's ass.

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  62. Yeah, Flair definitely seems like one of the biggest assholes in the business for sure. I'm glad Bischoff messed with him in retrospect.

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  63. At least he was consistent and thought unmasking equaled a bigger push. Wrong, but consistent.

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  64. TJ: I had Glenn Beck on this morning and he had Carey Elwes on. I'm not a fan of Beck, flipping stations and heard Elwes talking about Princess Bride so I stopped and heard a funny story on Andre the Giant. He said that for the horse riding scenes in the movie, the clydesdale with Andre on it had to be blindfolded it was so scared of Andre and Andre had to be lowered by wires onto it.


    So who knew Hulk Hogan worked on Princess Bride? He's the only one strong enough to lift the Giant, right?

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  65. So was there ever any fallout from Feinstein getting caught trying to pick up an underage boy? How is he 'back?' Why does anyone work with him? Usually that kind of thing gets you Benoit'd.

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  66. I hate sforcina. If I wanted to get someone's opinion on something Id read one of the million plus wrestling opinion sites out there. I want answers to real legit questions, something he seems incapable of providing on the regular. Long live byers

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  67. It's wrestling. Getting caught trying to pick up an underage boy is the equivalent to a speeding ticket in this business!

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  68. Ugh, then wrestling deserves every bit of the scummy reputation it has.

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  69. Wasn't Doug Gilbert basically blacklisted from wrestling for going off on Lawler for being a pedo?

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  70. Among other things, yes. It's a CLASSIC.

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  71. Trying to work on his banter for the LOW roundtables. Last I heard, he could dish it out, but couldn't take a shot.

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  72. My favorite story involves Lawler, Road Dogg, and Jamie Dundee in WWF. Lawler asks those two to stop smoking marijuana, and Road Dogg tells Lawler to stop sleeping with underage girls in response. Lawler didn't say another word.

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  73. Dundee tells that story so well in his YouShoot

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  74. Never saw that before, but here it is:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Is0oHPL-nis

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  75. Did you review that one?

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  76. Haha, never heard that one!

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  77. I just watched a clip of it. WOW, what a foulmouthed drunken weirdo. I'm not sure I could listen to him for more than 20 minutes.

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  78. Dundee said he was in the back with Road Dogg as Lawler and his son Brian Christopher was in the car too. Lawler told Dogg, who had a joint and a beer, if he was going to both smoke and drink all of that. Dogg said he was and that at least he wasn't fucking any 14 year olds. Lawler then apparently became silent afterwards as Dundee was in disbelief as to what Dogg said, thinking he cost him a shot in the WWF.

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  79. His Highspots shoot and the PG-13 shoot are better.

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  80. That makes me like Road Dogg so much lol.

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  81. It's wrestling, the sleaziest industry there is. I'm also surprised Feinstein was able to hang on and continue to thrive. He posted his side of the story a while ago and then deleted it, but it's a TLDR

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  82. Funny how a small part in a Stallone film basically changed wrestling into what it is today.

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  83. I heard a story once where Christy Mathewson a pitcher from the Giants in like the 1900's wouldn't conduct interviews with reporters who he had heard had cheated or hit their wives. Thats something you can respect. Maybe its a different time. Whatever. Meanwhile this doucebag is being interviewed by a pedophile.

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  84. In Flairs book he talks about how he helped bring hogan in, but was shocked that he basically made 3x as much as him.

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  85. Jamie Dundee shoots are always entertaining to say the least. If you don't like New Jack shoots, you probably won't like Dundee's. But you never know what's going to come out of either one of their mouths.

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  86. There also needs to be another Turner that tells someone to basically do whatever they want.

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  87. I may be one of the few who thought Bischoff was right when it came to the situation with Flair's son. Sometimes being a leader means having to be the bad guy.

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  88. Dead, thankfully.

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  89. How? I get where Hogan would be coming from there.

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  90. That was my immediate thought when reading this. Mike Graham, the man who brought Hogan in, came up with the NWO and suggested Hogan turn heel.

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  91. Check out the Biscoff episodes of the Austin podcast (there are four). Definitely worth listening to.

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  92. Nash talks about this in a shoot. He says he was going to replace Savage in the ads, but he said he wasn't up to it. Not sure how true that is - I find the idea of Nash turning down money pretty unbelievable, but then again maybe it wasn't him who'd be profiting from it.

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  93. CruelConnectionNumber2December 19, 2014 at 12:30 PM

    Yeah, the fallout was TNA severed ties with ROH immediately and pulled their talent (except Punk who quit TNA and stayed with ROH) and ROH eventually kicked Feinstein out of the company, basically. He still makes good dough with his video company and a lot of the heat from the sting is gone (plenty still recall it and hate him) but some of those fans are gone and some new fans have never heard of it.

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  94. what a softball interview... guy forgot to mention Eric losing tens of millions of dollars on the 1993 Beach Blast mini movies and Cactus Jack Lost In Celeveland that is a legendary lowpoint of wrestling television... or the Disney tapings being the first outright exposing of the business revealing title changes 6 months in advance... what a loser

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